Week 13: Daily bread

We still have not exchanged contracts. The buyer has a second solicitor, at the behest of his mortgage company, and the second solicitor is raising the same enquiries as the first solicitor, and in a similarly tardy fashion. Meanwhile, we have been pressured by our moving company to place a hefty deposit to secure our desired dates, the dates we – seller, buyer, agent – have in principle long agreed to, but which come ever closer with no guarantee they will be met.

At least I have conquered the attic, that long-term beneficiary of procrastination, indecision and amnesia. It is now empty.

Stuck in this tight spot, I should like to concentrate on bread. These are some of Husband’s recent loaves, which it has been my pleasure to eat and share. I am otherwise dumbfounded, hence this week’s brevity.

Our daily bread: the rye sourdough

Our daily bread: the rye sourdough

Rye sourdough released from its baking dome

Rye sourdough released from its baking dome – requires good gloves

The weekend treat: the levain

Weekend treat: the levain

Gluten-free bread with linseeds; probably the nicest gluten-free bread ever

Gluten-free bread with linseeds; probably the nicest gluten-free bread ever

 

Inside a cheese and olive bread; also black rye loaf and levain

Inside a cheese and olive bread; also black rye and levain

 

Bubbling sourdough starter: not doughy at all. Might not look appetising but it leads to wonderful bread

Bubbling sourdough starter: not doughy at all. Might not look appetising but it leads to wonderful bread

5 Comments

  1. Clare

    A timely post. Yesterday was Buhe in Ethiopia, a Christian Orthodox festival – the transfiguration of Jesus. Families and neighbours come together to light a bonfire (chibo) and sing songs. It is the tradition for young boys (not girls, they get their turn next month) to go from house to house singing songs, particularly one called “Hoya Hoye”, in exchange for homemade bread (defo` dabo, my phonetic spelling) and/or money. It is a joyous occasion. I arrived home late from work yesterday evening to find the guards dancing and singing around a bonfire! One of the cooks had made an enormous loaf of bread shaped like a slightly squashed whole parmisan cheese. It was delicious. I have ‘tinish’, a little, for my lunch today. I hope Portugal has similar bread-related traditions.

    Reply
    1. Edith (Post author)

      What a lovely coincidence. Thanks for this, Clare. It’s very cheering.

      Reply
  2. r oo t

    mein Gott sieht DAS Brot toll aus !

    Reply
  3. fatma

    I’m playing catch up again! Always enjoy your posts Edith Rabbit, brief or otherwise. You do write well! How exasperating re the non realization of the contract exchange. It is hard to fathom why it can be so difficult?? You have my sympathies!!

    Reply
  4. fatma

    ps. Husband is clearly a bread maker extraordinaire!

    Reply

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