Bufo bufo

A sunny morning back at home. House Martins were swimming through the air, sunlight turning them liquid

A sunny morning back at home. House Martins filled the air above, sunlight turning them liquid

River sparkle

River sparkle

Wading through the river in my new wellies

I can wade through the river in my new wellies

 

I arrived back from England wearing a pair of new, knee-length red wellies, which I’d found on sale in my mum’s village. I had worried about arcane airline regulations that prevent the wearing of long rubber footwear – who knows? – but they weren’t confiscated, though I did have to take them off to get through security. They are the Best Thing. The calf-length wellies that landed me in such cold water a couple of weeks ago have been cast aside, and in my knee-length ones I can wade properly through the river. I was happy to see the river hadn’t dried up in our absence, but equally it has never gone into spate like it did last year, when a torrent of brown water came down and filled the wide, shallow river bed from bank to bank.

At least there was enough water for the toads (Common Toad, Bufo bufo), who came into the water to mate. It was last week, just before we left for England. I saw something moving in the river: a squat and immobile thing, which pulled its head underwater on the approach of a human being but didn’t swim off like a turtle does. It turned out to be one of about half a dozen toads, each the size of a fat fist, waiting around for something to happen. The something was happening in one spot only, as you can see from the picture below. Whether there was only one female – the large one underneath is the female – and the others were males waiting their turn with her, I don’t know. I was disconcerted that they’d chosen one of the fording routes as their mating site and hoped they survived. Mind you, there is only about a car a day – usually ours.

Mating Common Toads (Bufo bufo), seen before we left for England

Underwater mating Common Toads (Bufo bufo), seen before we left for England

Bufo bufo waiting and hoping

Waiting and hoping

 

So when I returned from England in my wellies I went to see how the toads had got on. Clearly, mating had gone well. They must have all returned to their dry land sites because they were nowhere to be seen, but their translucent tubes of black eggs were left carelessly all over the place. The tubes often lay in pairs, looking like traffic-heavy dual-carriageways, following straight routes until forced to loop around rock obstructions, or piling up into occasional spaghetti junctions. This is Nature’s sustainable surplus at work. If all these eggs resulted in toads, the hillsides would be carpeted with them. As it is, only a tiny few of this vast number will survive. I had a go at working out how many eggs there might be; I quickly gave up. Even estimating the total length of tube wasn’t easy: certainly dozens of metres, maybe even a hundred. With so many eggs, and so few toads needed to sustain a stable population, the parents can afford to abandon them to fate – including the chance of being run over.

Toad egg roads - found on our return

Toad egg roads all through the river at the ford – found on our return

Toad eggs: Nature's miraculous abundance

Toad eggs: Nature’s miraculous abundance

 

Lemons

The lemon trees around here are doing a good job of sustainable surplus too. We had a picnic with friends among sobreiros (Quercus suber; cork oak trees) just before we left for England. It was a perfect day for walking and sunny enough for picnicking. On our way there, driving up the two-kilometre dirt track that is the high street of our local community, we passed Maria and pulled up for a chat. I had a Bulgarian cheese pie cooling on my lap – my contribution to the picnic. ‘She makes nice things,’ said Maria to Husband. (When your Portuguese isn’t that good, you get talked about more than to. I’m happy with that – I can listen in, like a child, trying to learn.) Husband said it was for a picnic, and then Maria insisted we take armfuls of their oranges to add to the spread. Theirs are the sweetest, juiciest oranges, so we were happy to. She also exhorted us to help ourselves to the abundant lemons. As we reached into the trees, gently twisting the fruit to see which were ready to fall into our hands, Maria said how much she liked a chocolate cake I’d made recently. It had been too much cake for us – the mood to bake a cake had arrived but without enough mouths at home to eat it – so when Eleuterio appeared on his tractor I had offered him a quarter to take away. It was very well received. ‘I like to bake cakes,’ I explained to Maria, in a sudden burst of Portuguese. ‘And I like to eat them,’ she replied, grinning broadly. She was less impressed, however, with my plans to preserve the excess of lemons with salt. Sweetness rules the day.

When lemons are so abundant, and grow most of the year round, it seems hardly worth the effort of preserving them. On the other hand, it is very difficult to let them go to waste, and preserving them adds new flavour notes. On the left: lemon slices layered with paprika; on the right, salted lemons

When lemons are so abundant, and grow most of the year round, it seems hardly worth the effort of preserving them. On the other hand, it is very difficult to let them go to waste, and preserving them adds new flavour notes. On the left: lemon slices layered with paprika; on the right, salted lemons

Finished. The pickled lemons have been topped up with oil, the salted ones with lemon juice, with bay leaves, cinnamon, peppercorns and coriander seeds. Just a few weeks to wait now until they are ready

Finished. The pickled lemons have been topped up with oil, the salted ones with lemon juice, along with bay leaves, cinnamon, peppercorns and coriander seeds. Just a few weeks to wait now until they are ready

8 Comments

  1. fatma

    What a lovely surprise and lovely post this week! Or have I missed a week and not realized it? No matter, very interesting pictures of the beaded necklace like line of eggs and, pickled lemons? Mmmmm. Haven’t, but would love to try that!

    Reply
  2. Hazel

    I’d never seen toad spawn until your pix. Fascinating. So different from that produced by frogs. I wonder if fish come along and eat most of it. Or even dogs . . . Lemons pickled straight off the tree would be a different experience from those pickled straight out of the Tesco plastic string net, I fancy . . . xx

    Reply
  3. Fiona

    Some lovely photos again and so interesting to see all those toad eggs. I was very excited to hear the call of a Little Owl from my front bedroom the other night, and thought of the one who perched nightly on the telegraph pole beside your house in Portugal.

    Reply
  4. Patricia Roberts

    Such lnterestlng pictures all those toad eggs wow ,l am learning a lot ,pleased your red wellies are already in use ,just one pair left and your size too,l love your chats with Maria ,it was so lovely to see you both ,enjoy being back in your lovely home.love Ma.

    Reply
  5. Clare

    The toad is a thing of beauty (as are salted lemons). A bucolic post this week. x

    Reply
  6. ali hazzah

    according to this report (see link below) not only have even more oil concessions been approved but it may be that the people of Portugal have gotten screwed on the deal due to possible gov corruption.

    see http://algarvedailynews.com/cases/algarve-oil/6805-government-issues-further-oil-exploration-licenses-off-the-algarve-coast

    i’m still toying with the idea of visiting in nov/dec ’16 during the rainy cold part of the year — to see if i still like it at its worst, which might mean i could love it at its best, should i make the move.

    At the risk of sounding like some crusty chap harrumphing in a creaky old Trevor Howard movie, it seems that the capacity of human beings to disappoint is about as infinite as nature’s to awe. sorry, but i just watched The Railway Man on netflix last night. *s*

    and then again, if the uk bails out of the eu, does that mean the end to the right to reside?

    Reply
    1. Edith (Post author)

      Hello: there’s no date on that report. Do you know when it was written/published? Thanks!

      Reply
  7. Patricia Roberts

    So much to read this week,you seem to be managing the snags that come up re the building of your pool ,all in order.lovely pictures such colours,I am looking forward to being with you.

    Reply

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